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Posts Tagged ‘Remembering the Past’

pastby Diane Norek Harrison

SOUTH AMBOY-This is from my own research. The cemetery for Sacred Heart Parish in South Amboy is located on Johnsons Lane in the Parlin section of Sayreville. The Sacred Heart Catholic War Veterans Post 578 erected large monuments with the names of the men who died from the parish. The one stone reads: “IN MEMORY OF ALL WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES WHILE SERVING THEIR COUNTRY IN THE TIME OF WAR.” The monuments were dedicated Nov. 11, 2001.

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pastBy Diane Norek Harrison

PERTH AMBOY-This is from material given to me by Rose (Tarloski) and Jerry Celecki: In 1960, Perth Amboy Police Department had one chief of police, three police captains, 11 lieutenants, fourteen sergeants, three detectives and 55 patrolmen. There were three radio cars, one detective car, one chauffeur’s car, one patrol wagon, one emergency truck, the police launch and chief’s car. There were also two motorcycles and two motor scooters.

SAYREVILLE-On May 2, 1956, six new patrolmen were appointed to the Sayreville Police Department. They were: Benjamin Boehm, Ronald Connors, James Guilfoyle, Edward Rappleyea, Francis Seaman and Stanley Swider.

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pastBy Diane Norek Harrison
WOODBRIDGE-Here are memories from readers:

Woodbridge Golden Bears
I received the following in an e-mail from Mark Curran: “Hi Diane, I am the son of Joe Curran # 76 in the photo of your Feb. 27, 2009 Atom Tabloid-Citizen & Gazette article about Woodbridge, New Jersey sports memories. The photo was taken during the 1952 season. My father Joe was in his senior year at Rider College playing quarterback. The Rider College football team went undefeated that year.

“My Dad would play his collegiate games on Friday night or Saturday mornings and if he was not too banged up after his Rider College game, he would drive up to Woodbridge and play for the Golden Bears on Sunday afternoons. He was chosen as the 1952 Most Valuable Player for the Golden Bears.  He is now 82 years old.”

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pastBy Diane Norek Harrison

ELIZABETH-Here are some memories from former Elizabeth resident Roger Stryeski: “Attached are some of my memories of Elizabeth in the 1970s.  Most are concerning food and where to get it. I came to Elizabeth and St. Elizabeth’s Hospital in 1974 and worked there until 1987. Coming from a small Bergen County town, this was the first city, excluding college and the Army, that I lived in.  And it was a fun food town to be in and single.

“After the evening shift, there was the eternal Spirito’s and later Finnagel’s at the arch.  Spirito’s was no butter and constant yelling and screaming and utensils being thrown in the kitchen.  Good Friday was the big day with clam sauce.  Finnagel’s had an American menu and the kitchen was open late catering to the Eastern Airlines crowd.  It was the first place to have Newcastle Brown Ale.

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 pastby Diane Norek Harrison

WOODBRIDGE-Here are a few memories from Jim Kacmarsky, in response to my Feb. 6 column on the Perth Amboy and Woodbridge clay pits.  

“I grew up in Fords section of Woodbridge, and the clay pits were part of my life. They were at the end of my street (Carlton Street) in Fords. There were many ponds, where I used to catch sunfish and frogs. The main pond was called ‘Catfish Pond’, although I never caught any catfish in it. There were also lots of ponds with green water, that we called ‘acid ponds.’ No life in them – probably toxic waste. There was a ‘No Trespassing’ sign outside with ‘Mc House Clay Company’ on it, and also a US Government Reservation – ‘Keep Out’ sign outside the woods. Last time I visited, there is now a highway through the whole place.

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 pastby Diane Norek Harrison

EDISON-I received an e-mail from Ted Pastusczak which reads: “Hi Diane, I just read your article from Jan. 30 on Menlo Park – great stuff.

“I remember when the mall opened in 1960 or so.  It had a Martin Paint store, Wallachs Men’s Shop, Archie Jacobson, Soundarama records, Canadians, and so forth.

“It also had two supermarkets – a Shop Rite and a Finest, and its own post office. 

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 pastby Diane Norek Harrison

 SOUTH AMBOY-This item is from my cousin Deborah Cooney Marion. Deb owned the home on the corner of Highland Street and Hillcrest Avenue in the 1980s. She was told it was the original Dieker farm house from Bordentown Avenue in Sayreville. She was also told by the late Mr. Dieker himself, that it was the house he was born in when it was on Bordentown Avenue. It was moved from the Bordentown Avenue location, circa 1920s. Deb was told it was wrapped in chains and pulled to Highland St. by horses with logs on the bottom of it that had soap on them.

Here is a memory from former South Amboy resident Chris Kierst. He remembers walking over the Raritan River Railroad bridge on Bordentown Avenue, next to where the Raritan Diner was located, when a steam locomotive passed underneath and was enveloped in smoke.

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